Monday, 24 November 2014

Our World Tuesday, ABC Wednesday, T for Toadstools,Biology, Netherlands





During our stay at the holiday park in Hoenderloo, we saw a great variety of toadstools, of which we don't know the names. As usual I wanted to have some information about toad-stools and mushrooms, but I got so much to read that I decided to keep this post as short as possible.

The thing is that I must tell you that toadstools are very important for our environment. Without them trees will die and consequently so will we.

Because toadstools are so different from other organism around us, people thought for a long time that they were creations of witches, evil spirits or gnomes.

Now we can enjoy their beauty easily, even if we don't know much about them.

At school I learnt that we can divide them in several groups.




There  are mushrooms with gills under their caps,

but boletes, have tubes extending downward from

the underside of the cap, rather than gills.

Boletus edulis (English: cep, penny bun, porcino, or king bolete, usually called porcini)

(Wikipedia)


The following article might help to understand that this group of fungi is complicated but very interesting.


By Susan Patterson, Master Gardener

Mushrooms are sometimes an annoyance to homeowners who do not welcome them in their gardens or lawns and often wish to get rid of them. However, mushrooms are considered decay fungi and make quick work of organic matter, such as thatch in lawns or compost materials. Their presence in the lawn and garden greatly improve the quality of soil. But how does one distinguish between various types of mushrooms? Continue reading to learn more about mushroom identification.

 

 

Mushroom Identification

A real mushroom is in the shape of an umbrella with a cup-shaped or flat cap on top of a stalk. Spores are produced by a group of cells, called basidia, found on the underside of the mushroom cap. While mushrooms come in all shapes, sizes and colors, the general structure remains the same.

These funny looking structures are actually fruiting bodies, or flowers that are produced by fungi. The body of the fungus is actually underground. There are many kinds of fruit bodies that are not true mushrooms, including puffball and morels. There are over 8,000 types of mushrooms found throughout the world. These include toadstools and fairy ring mushrooms.

Toadstool Info

Learning about mushrooms includes toadstool info. Many people are curious about the difference between a mushroom and a toadstool. In fact, the word is often used interchangeably. However, toadstools are actually considered poisonous mushrooms.

To be on the safe side, it is always best to consider all mushrooms as poisonous unless you are an expert at mushroom identification. Poisonous mushrooms, when eaten, can cause serious illness and in some cases, even death.

What are Fairy Rings?

You’ve probably heard mention of fairy rings at some point or other. So what are fairy rings? Lawn mushrooms that form a distinctive arc or circle, especially in the lawn, are known as “fairy rings.” They are the result of a special fungus called fairy ring, and there are between 30 and 60 different types of fairy ring fungi.

Fairy ring fungi feed on decaying matter in the lawn and tend to be worse in poor or sandy soil. Fairy rings can become very dense and kill grass. Good lawn aeration generally helps improve the quality of soil and reduce the presence of fairy rings.

This article was last updated on


.







This is my contribution for the letter T. Thanks to Denise Nesbitt who created this meme about 7 years ago !

Thanks to Roger who organizes these contributions every week.

Welcome to Our World Tuesday! This meme continues in memory of the work of Klaus Peter, whose "that's My World" brought people together from around the world every Monday to share the wonders therein--big and small.Please click on our  logo for "Our World Tuesday" in the sidebar. Thank you Team of O. W. T.!






31 comments:

Sylvia K said...

Great post for the day and terrific photos as always, Wil!! Thanks for sharing! I do hope you have a wonderful new week! Enjoy!!

eileeninmd said...

Wonderful series of images. I like seeing all the different mushrooms and fungi.. Great info and post.. Have a happy week!

carol l mckenna said...

Wow! What a great series post and photos of mushrooms!

Happy Thanksgiving in the USA
artmusedog and carol
www.acreativeharbor.com

ladyfi said...

What a lovely and fascinating series of shots.

Rajesh said...

Wonderful shots of great variety. Thanks for sharing.

Anita said...

So many here!
I love mushrooms a lot. Need to avoid the poisonous toadstools & mushrooms though...
Have a great week, Wil!

Marcy said...

Fascinating topic and terrific post for T! Enjoyed the pictures too.

T is for...

Felicia said...

beautiful images of fungi. I really like the red one with spots.

Roger Owen Green said...

I am ALWAYS wary of 'shrooms, unless I KNOW they ae safe!
ROG, ABCW

Trubes said...

Wonderful post Wil, so much to take in that I shall read it again, brilliant photography too!

You are a veritable mine of information, no wonder you have so many fans.


Happy weekend,
love Di xx

Hildred said...

A very interesting post, Wil. I have a passion for mushrooms (although I don't go out and pick them) but I didn't know how essential the are to our environment.

Marvelous pictures!

Arnoldo L. Romero, MLA said...

I've always been fascinated by mushrooms, even though we don't get a wide variety in my part of the world. I think they make a great subject to photograph and sketch too. Blessings!

lotusleaf said...

Wonderful post! I am also a lover of mushrooms.

happywonderer.com said...

Wonderful photos of Toadstools/mushrooms!
We've seen some very interesting ones this year.
Great choice for the letter T...

Chubskulit Rose said...

I love all these. I love taking photos of them in the woods!
Thankful

Terri said...

Very interesting! I've always used the two words to describe what I thought was the same thing..now I know a bit more about them. Thanks for sharing.

Gattina said...

My grandpa was exceptional he knew all mushrooms growing in the woods !
We had a lot of mushrooms growing in our garden and my cleaning lady asked me if she could take them, I hope she will show up next week ....

Lea said...

Very interesting and great choice for 'T'
Have a wonderful week!
Lea

GreensboroDailyPhoto said...

Toadstools are magical. Have you taken all those photos? I always expect to see a fairy sitting on the red capped ones!

Janis
Greensboro Daily Photo

Lmkazmierczak said...

Wow, I learned quite a bit, thanks for the info♪ http://lauriekazmierczak.com/sky-tipping/

Miss_Yves said...

Merci pour cette belle promenade colorée et instructive, qui va bien avec la bannière d'automne!

SamuraiFrog said...

Gorgeous pictures. I've loved toadstools ever since I was a kid, probably because I was so interested in things like fairies. But they're just so neat to look at and to draw, too. I used to love to see them when our neighborhood was more wooded when I was a kid.

Ann said...

I have friends who collect morel mushrooms every year on their property. This always makes me a little nervous.
Ann

Powell River Books said...

It's schroom season in Powell River. Buyers are in town and the pickers are in the bush. I don't know good from bad, so I just enjoy the fruits of others. - Margy

Susan Moore said...

Very interesting and great photos!

Beverley Baird said...

Wow - great photos of all those mushrooms. Lots to learn!

Ann, Chen Jie Xue 陈洁雪 said...

Love eating mushroom, but don't dare to eat those wild ones.

Black Jack's Carol said...

Even though I didn't make it all the way through all of the information, I sure learned a lot, here. Many thanks for the Thorough research. You took some fine pictures and found others as well. I'm wondering if you have ever written about your war experiences. Perhaps, I need to go back through your blog to answer my own question :) Have a very happy weekend!

Marja said...

Fantastic photos I actually didn't know that poisenous mushrooms are called toadstools I love the red and white ones

Ann, Chen Jie Xue 陈洁雪 said...

I just came back from a bible study group, and we talked about the big flood in Netherlands in 1953 and many Dutch people came to Australia and New Zealand. A friend said her Principal told the kids, we are all New Zealanders.

Thanks for educating me about Netherland and Norway. To us here, it's all Northern Europe.

I wish I had known you in 2005.

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

Some of these are exactly like the ones we saw near Skagway in Alaska --- I am in awe of the time you took to do research (as you always do). This was great information. All I did was take pictures and marvel at the 'magic'.... your brain is staying so much more active than mine. Thank you for the good example and the great information.