Hoenderloo

Hoenderloo
Hoenderloo

Monday, 24 November 2014

Our World Tuesday, ABC Wednesday, T for Toadstools,Biology, Netherlands





During our stay at the holiday park in Hoenderloo, we saw a great variety of toadstools, of which we don't know the names. As usual I wanted to have some information about toad-stools and mushrooms, but I got so much to read that I decided to keep this post as short as possible.

The thing is that I must tell you that toadstools are very important for our environment. Without them trees will die and consequently so will we.

Because toadstools are so different from other organism around us, people thought for a long time that they were creations of witches, evil spirits or gnomes.

Now we can enjoy their beauty easily, even if we don't know much about them.

At school I learnt that we can divide them in several groups.




There  are mushrooms with gills under their caps,

but boletes, have tubes extending downward from

the underside of the cap, rather than gills.

Boletus edulis (English: cep, penny bun, porcino, or king bolete, usually called porcini)

(Wikipedia)


The following article might help to understand that this group of fungi is complicated but very interesting.


By Susan Patterson, Master Gardener

Mushrooms are sometimes an annoyance to homeowners who do not welcome them in their gardens or lawns and often wish to get rid of them. However, mushrooms are considered decay fungi and make quick work of organic matter, such as thatch in lawns or compost materials. Their presence in the lawn and garden greatly improve the quality of soil. But how does one distinguish between various types of mushrooms? Continue reading to learn more about mushroom identification.

 

 

Mushroom Identification

A real mushroom is in the shape of an umbrella with a cup-shaped or flat cap on top of a stalk. Spores are produced by a group of cells, called basidia, found on the underside of the mushroom cap. While mushrooms come in all shapes, sizes and colors, the general structure remains the same.

These funny looking structures are actually fruiting bodies, or flowers that are produced by fungi. The body of the fungus is actually underground. There are many kinds of fruit bodies that are not true mushrooms, including puffball and morels. There are over 8,000 types of mushrooms found throughout the world. These include toadstools and fairy ring mushrooms.

Toadstool Info

Learning about mushrooms includes toadstool info. Many people are curious about the difference between a mushroom and a toadstool. In fact, the word is often used interchangeably. However, toadstools are actually considered poisonous mushrooms.

To be on the safe side, it is always best to consider all mushrooms as poisonous unless you are an expert at mushroom identification. Poisonous mushrooms, when eaten, can cause serious illness and in some cases, even death.

What are Fairy Rings?

You’ve probably heard mention of fairy rings at some point or other. So what are fairy rings? Lawn mushrooms that form a distinctive arc or circle, especially in the lawn, are known as “fairy rings.” They are the result of a special fungus called fairy ring, and there are between 30 and 60 different types of fairy ring fungi.

Fairy ring fungi feed on decaying matter in the lawn and tend to be worse in poor or sandy soil. Fairy rings can become very dense and kill grass. Good lawn aeration generally helps improve the quality of soil and reduce the presence of fairy rings.

This article was last updated on


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This is my contribution for the letter T. Thanks to Denise Nesbitt who created this meme about 7 years ago !

Thanks to Roger who organizes these contributions every week.

Welcome to Our World Tuesday! This meme continues in memory of the work of Klaus Peter, whose "that's My World" brought people together from around the world every Monday to share the wonders therein--big and small.Please click on our  logo for "Our World Tuesday" in the sidebar. Thank you Team of O. W. T.!






Tuesday, 18 November 2014

ABC Wednesday, S, Scandinavia,Sod roof .

The first time I visited Norway I saw these remarkable houses covered by grass roofs. I was fascinated by the look of them. A long time before, I had met a Norwegian young man in one of the workcamps, where we worked during the holidays as volunteers. He told me a lot about Norway and also about the grass roofs. He said that some farmers put their goats on top of the roofs to keep the grass short and to prevent trees from growing on the houses.



Maihaugen in Lillehammer


Valdres Folkemuseum


Valdres Folkemuseum

"A sod roof or turf roof is a traditional Scandinavian type of green roof covered with sod on top of several layers of birch bark on gently sloping wooden roof boards. Until the late 19th century, it was the most common roof on rural log houses in large parts of Scandinavia.


 The load of approximately 250 kg per m² of a sod roof is an advantage because it helps to compress the logs and makes the walls more draught-proof. In winter the total load may well increase to 400 or 500 kg per m² because of snow.


 The birch bark underneath ensures that the roof will be waterproof.

The term ‘sod roof’ is somewhat misleading, as the active, water-tight element of the roof is birch bark. The main purpose of the sod is to hold the birch bark in place. "( Wikipedia)


.A sod roof has a lot of advantages: Firstly it is cheap, for the materials used for it, like birch bark and grass turf, are available in abundance.
Secondly: It's an ideal way of insulation in the cold and long Scandinavian winters.

But it requires a lot of time! No problem, for neighbours and friends are invited to join in a roofing party

    History


    Sod roofs on farmhouses in Gudbrandsdal, Norway. Photo: Roede.


    This practice of covering roofs with birch bark and grass sods in Scandinavia, dates back to prehistory. The Vikings and People from the Middle Ages built their houses this way.This lasted until the beginning of the 18th century. Gradually houses in towns were built with tiled roofs and sod roofs almost disappeared, This was considered to be a threat  to ancient traditions. This caused a general revival of vernacular traditions, including these sod roofs.


    Maihaugen



    Mountain lodges and holiday homes with sod roofs became very popular. Open air museums like Maihaugen in Lillehammer, and reservations all over Norway, contributed to a better knowledge of the ancient culture of Norway and the rest of Scandinavia.



    Røros, old mining town


    Røros, old mining town.

     Isn't it wonderful to have flowers on your house?

    From these reservations, sod roofs have begun to reappear as an alternative to modern materials. The more recent idea of the green roof is developed independently from the traditional sod roof, but could benefit from the experience gathered during hundreds of years in Scandinavia.

    Birch bark


    Doukhobor house in Yefremovka, Georgia, with a sod roof.

    Birch bark is important for a sod roof, for it is strong, water-resistant and soil-resistant enough to last for generations, although 30 years was considered the normal lifespan of a sod roof in most places. Birch is common everywhere in Northern Europe, and its bark is easily stripped from the trunk in spring or early summer, while the sap is running.


    "Bark has to be weighted down with a heavier material to prevent it  from curling or blowing away. Therefore sod is used and this  has an additional advantage because it is an insulator.


     The first layer of sod was traditionally placed with the grass down, as the wilted grass would protect the bark from acid humus and act as a drain. The grass of the second layer faced upwards to establish a solid surface. Grass roots would eventually permeate the bottom layer to create one solid structure. The finished roof would in time look just like a flower-studded meadow. "( Wikipedia)




    With thanks to Denise Nesbitt,  who created ABC, and Roger, who took over from her. For more interesting ABC posts click on the logo in the sidebar. This week we are looking for words beginning with  S.



    Tuesday, 11 November 2014

    ABC Wednesday, R for. Red




    Whitsuntide  Feast of Fire and Holy Ghost




    "Red is the color of blood, rubies and strawberries. Red is commonly associated with danger, sacrifice, passion, fire, beauty, blood, anger, socialism and communism, and in China and many other cultures, with happiness."(Wikipedia)

    For me Red is the colour of freedom, joy, and especially red roses are a symbol of love and passion. In our church the minister wears a white gown with a red liturgical stole at Christmas, Easter and Whit   Sunday. These are the most festive holy days in Christianity.









    "Inside an archeological site on the coast of South Africa, paleoanthropologists in 2000 found evidence that, between 170,000 and 40,000 years ago, Late Stone Age people were scraping and grinding ochre, a clay colored red by iron oxide, probably with the intention of using it to color their bodies." The Aborigines in Australia also used this colour red.

    The Aborigines in Australia also used this colour red.






    With thanks to Denise Nesbitt,  who created ABC, and Roger, who took over from her. For more interesting ABC posts click on the logo in the sidebar. This week we are looking for words beginning with R


    Tuesday, 4 November 2014

    ABC Wednesday, Q for Q-words


    Thanks to Denise Nesbitt,  who created ABC, and Roger, who took over from her. For more interesting ABC posts click on the logo in the sidebar. This week we are looking for words beginning with Q


    Unbelievable , but we've arrived at one of the most difficult letters of the alphabet: the Q.

    This post was once used as an introduction of the letter Q. At this moment I am on a holiday and couldn't find another post. I am sure you can find all the meanings of these words and translate them in normal English. I am looking forward to reading all your translations in modern English.


     

    To queue or not to queue that is the question! I raise a query here! Does this quaint quotation qualify as being quickly and quietly questioned by the quarrelsome son of Queen Gertrud? He was never in Queensland, never travelled with Qantas, never saw a large quantity of Quinkan Rock Art of high quality.

    Quite questionable
    if he ever played quarter notes in a quartet of queers. He never read a quarterly, never answered a quiz, but the quintessence was: he was quite quizzical , quippish and quick-tempered.

    Monday, 27 October 2014

    Our World Tuesday, ABC Wednesday, P for Pancakes

    Every year in October our choir of senior citizens organizes a Pancake Party. We have to  go by car to the neighbouring village of Bergambacht. The Pancake restaurant is situated next to a windmill. It is open on Tuesdays till Saturdays from 10.00 till 21.00. On weekdays mentally retarded people work here with great enthusiasm and skill. They are supervised by the permanent staff. It is a great success.


    There were three different kind of pancakes: naturel, pancakes with bacon and pancakes with cheese.

    Further more we could have a salad , a meat dish, apples and raisins compote and a spicy sauce.


    A meal is important but more important is the social side of  meeting  people of our age. We talked a lot, which we cannot do during choir practice.


    Pancakes with bacon


    A dish of minced meat


    Apples and raisins


    Salad of fresh vegetables


    A fruit compote of red berries, strawberries  


    One of our sopranos

    One of our altos


    The restaurant is called "Onder de Molen", which means : "Under the Mill".

    This mill houses a souvenirshop, and of course we wanted to see what we could buy there.

    This is what I bought:






    Bergambacht is the name of the village. It 's a typically Dutch place.











    With thanks to Denise Nesbitt,  who created ABC, and Roger, who took over from her. For more interesting ABC posts click on the logo in the sidebar. This week we are looking for words beginning with P

     

    Welcome to Our World Tuesday! This meme continues in memory of the work of Klaus Peter, whose "that's My World" brought people together from around the world every Monday to share the wonders therein--big and small.Please click on our  logo for "Our World Tuesday" in the sidebar. Thank you Team of O. W. T.!