Tuesday, 2 February 2016

ABC Wednesday, D for Didgeridoo

The didgeridoo is a wind instrument developed by Indigenous Australians of northern Australia potentially within the last 1,500 years and still in widespread use today both in Australia and around the world. It is sometimes described as a natural wooden trumpet or "drone pipe".
There are no reliable sources stating the didgeridoo's exact age. Archaeological studies of rock art in Northern Australia suggest that the people of the Kakadu region of the Northern Territory have been using the didgeridoo for less than 1,000 years, based on the dating of paintings on cave walls and shelters from this period.[2] A clear rock painting in Ginga Wardelirrhmeng, on the northern edge of the Arnhem Land plateau, from the freshwater period[3] (that was begun 1500 years ago)[4] shows a didgeridoo player and two songmen participating in an Ubarr Ceremony.[5]
A modern didgeridoo is usually cylindrical or conical, and can measure anywhere from 1 to 3 m (3 to 10 ft) long. Most are around 1.2 m (4 ft) long. Generally, the longer the instrument, the lower its pitch or key. However, flared instruments play a higher pitch than unflared instruments of the same length.
David Hudson demonstrates how to play this wonderful instrument in various ways. It is an excellent tutorial on Didgeridoo playing.(see You Tube)

The Didgeridoo is a traditional instrument of the Aboriginal people from Arnhem Land in Northern Australia. It was originally known as a Yirdaki in the traditional language..


An uncle of my daughter's ex husband made my didgeridoo. In order to find the right material he went to the forest and tapped on some thin tree-trunks until he found one with a good hollow sound. He then cut the tree, blew the termites out of the hollow pipe, and prepared it for its final shape.

Termites are needed to make tree-trunks hollow.


The first time I heard the sound of the digeridoo, I got goose-pimples and was highly impressed by its deep sounds. I love the way  animal sounds are imitated.

Sorry my video doesn't work, but on the photo you can see my didgeridoo leaning against the cupboard



With thanks to Denise Nesbitt, who created the ABC meme.For more interesting ABC posts click on the logo in the sidebar . This week we are looking for words beginning with D


Tuesday, 26 January 2016

ABC Wednesday, C for Calendar

Almost every year around Christmas I get one or more calenders.This year my eldest daughter made me one, which was a lovely surprise. She is a technical designer, who has to draw machinery and engines for an American factory. Last year they made a huge engine for New York for recycling all kind of plastic of the whole city. But in her spare time she draws illustrations for among other things, calenders. One of them is the one my daughter made.


A selfie of my daughter




A number of prehistoric structures have been proposed as having had the purpose of timekeeping (typically keeping track of the course of the solar year). This includes many megalithic structures, and reconstructed arrangements going back far into the Neolithic period.

A mesolithic arrangement of twelve pits and an arc found in Warren Field, Aberdeenshire, Scotland, dated to roughly 10,000 years ago, has been described as a lunar calendar and dubbed the "world's oldest known calendar" in 2013


January

Most of the oldest calendars were lunar calendars, based on the time interval from one new moon to the next—a so-called lunation. But even in a warm climate there are annual events that pay no attention to the phases of the Moon. In some areas it was a rainy season; in Egypt it was the annual flooding of the Nile River. The calendar had to account for these yearly events as well.





With thanks to Denise Nesbitt, who created the ABC meme.For more interesting ABC posts click on the logo in the sidebar . This week we are looking for words beginning with C and then we will have begun Round Eighteen



Tuesday, 19 January 2016

ABC Wednesday, B for "No Boots on the Ground!"

No boots on the ground... When I heard that for the first time, I was puzzled. What does it mean? Apparently there were many others who were at a loss,among them a couple of cartoonists, whose drawings you can see here.


BOOTS ON THE GROUND.......



We thank Denise Nesbitt, who created ABC, and we must thank Roger too for the weekly job to find  ten bloggers for each of the ABC Team members  to visit and to read their posts. For more interesting ABC posts click on the logo in the sidebar . This week we are looking for words  beginning with B.

Tuesday, 12 January 2016

ABC Wednesday, A for Absurdities

 We are arrived at a new round and starting with A.
These drawings are all made by Heath Robinson

William Heath Robinson (31 May 1872 – 13 September 1944) was an English cartoonist and illustrator best known for drawings of ridiculously complicated machines for achieving simple objectives.[1]
In the U.K., the term "Heath Robinson" entered the language during the 1914–1918 First World War as a description of any unnecessarily complex and implausible contrivance, much as "Rube Goldberg machines" came to be used in the U.S. from the 1920s onwards as a term for similar efforts. "Heath Robinson contraption" is perhaps more often used in relation to temporary fixes using ingenuity and whatever is to hand, often string and tape, or unlikely cannibalisations. Its continuing popularity was undoubtedly linked to Second World War Britain's shortages and the need to "make do and mend".



With thanks to Denise Nesbitt, who created the ABC mee.For more interesting ABC posts click on the logo in the sidebar . This week we are looking for words beginning with A and then we will have begun Round Eighteen

Monday, 4 January 2016

Our World Tuesday, ABC Wednesday, Z for Zutphen

Zutphen is an old city, which has seen a turbulent past and is already mentioned by the Romans. It has been inhabited continuously for 1700 years now. It is one of the oldest cities in the Netherlands.
In about 800 the settlement was incorperated in the Frankish Empire.
In the 9th century Zutphen was destroyed by the Vikings. After this a round ring-wall and moat were built by the end of that century.



Borrowed from "Kijk op Zutphen"


In 1284 and 1336 large parts of the town were burnt down, which resulted   in the construction of brick buildings. Zutphen became a member of the Hanse league, a co-operation of traders and cities  particularly in North Germany.
The 16th century  became very difficult for Zutphen due to the rise of other cities and the Eighty Years'War with Spain.
On 10 June 1572 the town was occupied by a brother- in- law of William of Orange, but in November the Spaniards came back and killed hundreds of the inhabitants. This is called The Massacre of Zutphen.

With thanks to Denise Nesbitt, who created the ABC meme.For more interesting ABC posts click on the logo in the sidebar . This week we are looking for words beginning with Z and then we will have finished round seventeen.


Welcome to Our World Tuesday! This meme continues in memory of the work of Klaus Peter, whose "that's My World" brought people together from around the world every Monday to share the wonders therein--big and small.Please click on our  logo for "Our World Tuesday" in the sidebar. Thank you Team of O. W. T.!

Zutphen now as we saw it on our walk.







Monday, 28 December 2015

ABC Wednesday, Y for You and Year


With thanks to Denise Nesbitt, who created ABC. For more interesting ABC posts click on the logo in the sidebar . This week we are looking for words beginning with Y.



This little verse by an unknown author says it all:


Four years ago I used the letter Y for Year and I got this new year's wish from
Janice Thomson. I wish you the same things she did.


Oliebollen is the traditional treat on New Year's Eve

I wish you enough sun to keep your attitude bright.
I wish you enough rain to appreciate the sun more.
I wish you enough happiness to keep your spirit alive.
I wish you enough pain so that the smallest joys in life appear much
bigger.
I wish you enough gain to satisfy your wanting.
I wish you enough loss to appreciate all that you possess.



HAPPY NEW YEAR!





Monday, 21 December 2015

ABC Wednesday,X for St.Andrew's Cross

When I was in Australia in July and August this year  I saw this spider. It was not the first time that I saw this kind of spider.

 This one made its web outside the window in front of the room where I slept. It is called a St. Andrew's Cross Spider because of the shape of the web. It's a perfect X., which is the letter of this week.in the ABC on Wednesday meme, invented by Mrs. Nesbitt.




from Australian Museum

The X is called the St. Andrew's cross because it is believed that the saint was martyred on a cross of this shape rather than the conventional + shape. St.Andrew was St.Peter's brother.

 

St Andrew's Cross Spider, Argiope keyserlingi 

 

The prey of the St Andrew's Cross Spider includes flies, moths, butterflies, bugs and bees. These are usually secured by silk wrapping into a neat parcel before being bitten - although smaller prey may be bitten first.

Other behaviours and adaptations

When threatened, the St Andrew's Cross Spider responds either by dropping from the web or shaking it so vigorously that both spider and stabilimentum become a blur, confusing its attacker. These measures don't always succeed, as indicated by empty, damaged webs and the presence of these spiders as food in the mud cells of wasps.
- See more at: http://australianmuseum.net.au/st-andrews-cross-spider#sthash.GqHt5NnU.dpuf

 

 

The prey of the St Andrew's Cross Spider includes flies, moths, butterflies, bugs and bees. These are usually secured by silk wrapping into a neat parcel before being bitten - although smaller prey may be bitten first.

Other behaviours and adaptations

When threatened, the St Andrew's Cross Spider responds either by dropping from the web or shaking it so vigorously that both spider and stabilimentum become a blur, confusing its attacker. These measures don't always succeed, as indicated by empty, damaged webs and the presence of these spiders as food in the mud cells of wasps.
- See more at: http://australianmuseum.net.au/st-andrews-cross-spider#sthash.GqHt5NnU.dpuf

Animal Species:St Andrew's Cross Spider, Argiope keyserlingi

St Andrew's Cross Spiders are named for their bright, cross-shaped web decorations.
St Andrew's Cross Spider, Argiope keyserlingi
St Andrew's Cross Spider, Argiope keyserlingi
Photographer: John Gollan © Australian Museum

Standard Common Name

St Andrew's Cross Spider

Alternative Name/s

Saint Andrew's Cross Spider

Identification

St Andrew's Cross Spiders are named for their bright web decorations - zig-zag ribbons of bluish-white silk that form a full or partial cross through the centre of the orb web. Females have a silvery carapace and a silver, yellow, red and black banded upper abdomen with two longitudinal yellow stripes below. The spider sits with the legs in pairs. The brown and cream coloured males are smaller than females.
The cream-coloured young spiders make a circular stabilimentum (like a white silk doily) that disguises them well and may also act as a sunshade. As the spider grows the 'doily' is gradually transformed into a 'cross'.
- See more at: http://australianmuseum.net.au/st-andrews-cross-spider#sthash.VeNU3zDG.dpuf

Animal Species:St Andrew's Cross Spider, Argiope keyserlingi

St Andrew's Cross Spiders are named for their bright, cross-shaped web decorations.
St Andrew's Cross Spider, Argiope keyserlingi
St Andrew's Cross Spider, Argiope keyserlingi
Photographer: John Gollan © Australian Museum

Standard Common Name

St Andrew's Cross Spider

Alternative Name/s

Saint Andrew's Cross Spider

Identification

St Andrew's Cross Spiders are named for their bright web decorations - zig-zag ribbons of bluish-white silk that form a full or partial cross through the centre of the orb web. Females have a silvery carapace and a silver, yellow, red and black banded upper abdomen with two longitudinal yellow stripes below. The spider sits with the legs in pairs. The brown and cream coloured males are smaller than females.
The cream-coloured young spiders make a circular stabilimentum (like a white silk doily) that disguises them well and may also act as a sunshade. As the spider grows the 'doily' is gradually transformed into a 'cross'.
- See more at: http://australianmuseum.net.au/st-andrews-cross-spider#sthash.VeNU3zDG.dpuf

Monday, 14 December 2015

Our World Tuesday, ABC Wednesday, W for Waka waka

Help spread Light and Power to the 1.2 billion people living in the dark




Two  years ago I had to fly back from Autralia to Amsterdam, but in Hong Kong I had to  wait a couple of hours for my flight to the Netherlands, at least I thought so, but it turned out  to be 36 hours due to a tornado over Hong Kong. This meant that I had to cancel my taxi from Amsterdam to my home.The problem was that the battery of my cellphone was almost depleted and I couldn't charge it.So when I read about the waka waka solar powered charger, I immediately bought a couple of these

devices. One for myself, the others as a present for relatives and friends. Another good thing is: the money spent on a waka waka is partly spent on a good cause in Asia or Africa.


Help spread Light and Power to the 1.2 billion people living in the dark

              


The waka waka can be best charged if you put it on a window sill in direct sunlight.


Welcome to Our World Tuesday! This meme continues in memory of the work of Klaus Peter, whose "that's My World" brought people together from around the world every Monday to share the wonders therein--big and small.Please click on our  logo for "Our World Tuesday" in the sidebar. Thank you Team of O. W. T.!

With thanks to Denise Nesbitt, who created ABC, and thanks to Roger. For more interesting ABC posts click on the logo in the sidebar. This week we are looking for words beginning with W.


Monday, 7 December 2015

Our World Tuesday, ABC Wednesday, V for Violet

If I want to describe the colour "violet"I can do that best by showing flowers.

Violet is a colour between blue and red


African violet


Peony


Rose


Geranium


Welcome to Our World Tuesday! This meme continues in memory of the work of Klaus Peter, whose "that's My World" brought people together from around the world every Monday to share the wonders therein--big and small.Please click on our  logo for "Our World Tuesday" in the sidebar. Thank you Team of O. W. T.!







With thanks to Denise Nesbitt, who created ABC. For more interesting ABC posts click on the logo in the sidebar . This week we are looking for words beginning with V.