Tuesday, 6 July 2010

ABC Wednesday Y for Yirdaki







The didgeridoo was born in the Northern Territory of Australia.
For the lover of Aboriginal arts and culture it is quite fortunate that the indigenous people of Northeast Arnhem Land meticulously maintained a long unbroken tradition to the fascinating art of making the 'didgeridoo,' an instrument which the YOLNGU artists of Northeast Arnhem Land refer to as the 'YIRDAKI'..
The two little boys are already playing the didgeridoo almost as it should be played with circular breathing. In a few years they can imitate all bush sounds like the barking of dingoes, the growling of the goanna, and the laughing of the kookaburra.


With thanks to Denise Nesbitt, who created ABC.For more interesting ABC posts click on the logo in the sidebar or Here. This week we are looking for words beginning with Y.

27 comments:

Miss_Yves said...

Merci pour cette découverte !

RuneE said...

I can guarantee that you have the most original Y this time over. And the most interesting and educational too. Well done!

Mara said...

I like the one with the two little boys. They are just like any other little boy in the world: finding an instrument that makes a noise and then making that noise. And hopefully some day they will find it can make music and will continue in that great tradition!

The Weaver of Grass said...

I love the sound it makes, Wil - it has such a primaeval feel to it.

anthonynorth said...

Never heard it called that before. A great instrument.

Sylvia K said...

Oh, I agree completely with RuneE! Definitely the most original post for the day and so interesting! Love the videos! Hope you have a wonderful week, Wil! Enjoy!

Sylvia

Vicki Lane said...

Love the immediacy of the video!

photowannabe said...

Totally fascinating and absolutely original. Thanks for showing these cute little guys and their talents.
I had forgotten what the diggeredo sounded like.

Hildred and Charles said...

Marvelous post. Didn't know of this name for the didgeridoo, - I have always loved the sound of this instrument. It speaks to the ancient part of us.

Paula Scott said...

Oh, MY!!!! It amazing that those little ones can produce all that sound so effortlessly! I'm not fooled. Although, I have no idea how to do circular breathing. Both videos are mesmerizing.
And, isn't it interesting that we are able to witness events like this via You Tube? Talk about bridging cultural gaps.

Life with Kaishon said...

That is nothing short of amazing!

I think you win for most creative Y :) Way to go!

Roger Owen Green said...

yes, your Y probably won't be duplicated! very nice, interesting sound.

ROG, ABC Wednesday team

Gayle said...

Just like Xavier Rudd of last week, I enjoy your exposure of new types of music.

SandyCarlson said...

I am glad this culture is alive and well. Thanks for this insight into this fascinating instrument.

Tumblewords: said...

I've never heard the word - fascinating - I do like the sound from the instrument!

Barbara Martin said...

This is lovely, Wil, to see tradition continued.

Arkansas Patti said...

Ah, my favorite new word,didgeridoo. I wasn't sure about circular breathing but when watching them I realized that they produce sound on inhale as well as exhale so perhaps that is what is meant by circular. Really interesting.

Janice Thomson said...

Fascinating videos on this little known instrument. A delight to hear Wil.

Gattina said...

It's a strange music, but I like it.
Gattina from ABC team

Miss_Yves said...

Merci de votre visite
Pour répondre à votre question:
il s'agit d'un haras national, tous les étalons et toutes les juments ont un pedigree, la reproduction doit être faite scientifiquement (analyses par exemple) et sans risque pour les juments (de race, de prix)qui pourraient être blessées par les morsures et les ruades des étalons .
Le coût de l'"opération" comprend d'abord les frais techniques (peu élevés ) et le résultat(qui dépend du pedigree des parents).
c'est-à dire la naissance du poulain.Donc la deuxième partie des frais s'effectue à la naissance SI tout s'est bien passé.

Gerald (Hyde DP) said...

well that's a new Y for me. re my double-dutch remark at mara's - english is such a diverse complicated language it is amazing so many people speak it whilst the british in general are poor at learning other languages.

Cloudia said...

love that sound....and YOU, Wil!






Aloha from Waikiki

Comfort Spiral

Indrani said...

Unique 'Y'. I learnt something new.

Regina said...

Beautiful post!
Have a great day.

Regards.

Michele J said...

A beautiful instrument, so wonderfully carved and decorated. I admire the traditions of other cultures, it amazes me!

I hope you are well, my friend.
Thank you for coming by when you do.
Hugs♥

Dina said...

Thanks for these videos, Wil. It's so nice to see the instruments played not in a tourist setting.
Such energy in the music and dancing!

Kay said...

That really has the most incredible sound. It looks so difficult to play.