Monday, 21 December 2015

ABC Wednesday,X for St.Andrew's Cross

When I was in Australia in July and August this year  I saw this spider. It was not the first time that I saw this kind of spider.

 This one made its web outside the window in front of the room where I slept. It is called a St. Andrew's Cross Spider because of the shape of the web. It's a perfect X., which is the letter of this week.in the ABC on Wednesday meme, invented by Mrs. Nesbitt.




from Australian Museum

The X is called the St. Andrew's cross because it is believed that the saint was martyred on a cross of this shape rather than the conventional + shape. St.Andrew was St.Peter's brother.

 

St Andrew's Cross Spider, Argiope keyserlingi 

 

The prey of the St Andrew's Cross Spider includes flies, moths, butterflies, bugs and bees. These are usually secured by silk wrapping into a neat parcel before being bitten - although smaller prey may be bitten first.

Other behaviours and adaptations

When threatened, the St Andrew's Cross Spider responds either by dropping from the web or shaking it so vigorously that both spider and stabilimentum become a blur, confusing its attacker. These measures don't always succeed, as indicated by empty, damaged webs and the presence of these spiders as food in the mud cells of wasps.
- See more at: http://australianmuseum.net.au/st-andrews-cross-spider#sthash.GqHt5NnU.dpuf

 

 

The prey of the St Andrew's Cross Spider includes flies, moths, butterflies, bugs and bees. These are usually secured by silk wrapping into a neat parcel before being bitten - although smaller prey may be bitten first.

Other behaviours and adaptations

When threatened, the St Andrew's Cross Spider responds either by dropping from the web or shaking it so vigorously that both spider and stabilimentum become a blur, confusing its attacker. These measures don't always succeed, as indicated by empty, damaged webs and the presence of these spiders as food in the mud cells of wasps.
- See more at: http://australianmuseum.net.au/st-andrews-cross-spider#sthash.GqHt5NnU.dpuf

Animal Species:St Andrew's Cross Spider, Argiope keyserlingi

St Andrew's Cross Spiders are named for their bright, cross-shaped web decorations.
St Andrew's Cross Spider, Argiope keyserlingi
St Andrew's Cross Spider, Argiope keyserlingi
Photographer: John Gollan © Australian Museum

Standard Common Name

St Andrew's Cross Spider

Alternative Name/s

Saint Andrew's Cross Spider

Identification

St Andrew's Cross Spiders are named for their bright web decorations - zig-zag ribbons of bluish-white silk that form a full or partial cross through the centre of the orb web. Females have a silvery carapace and a silver, yellow, red and black banded upper abdomen with two longitudinal yellow stripes below. The spider sits with the legs in pairs. The brown and cream coloured males are smaller than females.
The cream-coloured young spiders make a circular stabilimentum (like a white silk doily) that disguises them well and may also act as a sunshade. As the spider grows the 'doily' is gradually transformed into a 'cross'.
- See more at: http://australianmuseum.net.au/st-andrews-cross-spider#sthash.VeNU3zDG.dpuf

Animal Species:St Andrew's Cross Spider, Argiope keyserlingi

St Andrew's Cross Spiders are named for their bright, cross-shaped web decorations.
St Andrew's Cross Spider, Argiope keyserlingi
St Andrew's Cross Spider, Argiope keyserlingi
Photographer: John Gollan © Australian Museum

Standard Common Name

St Andrew's Cross Spider

Alternative Name/s

Saint Andrew's Cross Spider

Identification

St Andrew's Cross Spiders are named for their bright web decorations - zig-zag ribbons of bluish-white silk that form a full or partial cross through the centre of the orb web. Females have a silvery carapace and a silver, yellow, red and black banded upper abdomen with two longitudinal yellow stripes below. The spider sits with the legs in pairs. The brown and cream coloured males are smaller than females.
The cream-coloured young spiders make a circular stabilimentum (like a white silk doily) that disguises them well and may also act as a sunshade. As the spider grows the 'doily' is gradually transformed into a 'cross'.
- See more at: http://australianmuseum.net.au/st-andrews-cross-spider#sthash.VeNU3zDG.dpuf

13 comments:

Leslie: said...

Good thing I'm not squeamish about spiders like my daughters! I find them fascinating and this one especially so. Great shot, too! Have a wonderful Xmas!

Leslie
abcw team

Roger Owen Green said...

Very appropriate for the season!
ROG, ABCW

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

An inspired find for a letter that must be quite difficult! Fascinating spider .... I did remember about St Andrews cross, from my childhood religion classes!

Melody Steenkamp said...

wat een bijzondere bijdrage Wil, en wat een mooi diertje... heb het nog nooit gezien !

Heel fijne dagen toegewenst.

photowannabe said...

This is why I love our blogs. I learn so many interesting things about this world.
The web of the spider is quite fascinating. Never heard of it before.
Merry Christmas Wil.

Hildred said...

Thank you, Wil, for an informative and appropriate post, and a very merry Christmas to you....

carol l mckenna said...

Wonderful photos and great information for X

Wishing you the magic and love of this season today and everyday,
artmusedog and carol

ellen b. said...

Amazing. I've never seen anything like this. A very Merry Christmas to you and yours!

jeannettestgermain said...

About the web of this spider - you are a remarkable observer, Wil! When I was scrolling down to the comments I caught a glance of your back yard, which automatically takes me back to our day together in Holland. Warm memories!

Lea said...

Very interesting! Great choice for the letter X
Merry Christmas!
Lea

beataboutthebook said...

What amazing workmanship. Nature is truly wonderful.

jeannettestgermain said...

So sorry Wil about your fall! Hope you have someone to help you? Take care and hope your wrist will heal soon, and despite this you have a wonderful Christmas and happy New Year!

Patty said...

Dear Wil, I hate spiders, except for the ones I call Granddaddy Long Legs. I'm also sorry to hear about your fall. How are you doing by now? Falls are one thing we don't tolerate too well. I know I took one several years back while on the patio, fell backwards and hit the back of my head that caused a HUGE knot, rescue took me to the trauma center, since I'm on blood thinners, they doctor said that was good, the swelling was coming out and not going in. I had a horrible bruise for quite some time. Now remember to try to stay in an upright position. I also try to keep watching my feet at all times. I think I put photos on my Blog, but it's been about 2 1/2 years ago. Take care. Hope your girls and their families are all doing well. Love, Patty