Wednesday, 31 October 2012

Halloween.

The information here is all from Wikipedia as I don't know much about  Halloween.

Trick-or-treating is a customary celebration for children on Halloween. Children go in costume from house to house, asking for treats such as candy or sometimes money, with the question, "Trick or treat?" The word "trick" refers to a (mostly idle) "threat" to perform mischief on the homeowners or their property if no treat is given. In this custom the child performs some sort of trick, i.e. sings a song or tells a ghost story, to earn their treats.

In the Netherlands children are not going from door to door. We have some kind of Halloween  celebrations like  lanterns and costumes.

Halloween in Kobe

13 comments:

Dina said...

Hi Wil. I'm quite happy that we don't have Halloween in Israel.

Reader Wil said...

So am I!

Miss_Yves said...

Mise à la mode en France dans les années 90, pour des raisons commerciales, cette fête , en perte de vitesse, n'a de succès qu'auprès des enfants qui se déguisent et font le tour des maisons, mais moins que dans les années 90

http://leplus.nouvelobs.com/contribution/677721-halloween-en-france-pourquoi-cela-marche-seulement-aupres-des-enfants.html

Roger Owen Green said...

BOO!

Sylvia K said...

Trick or Treaters here in Seattle are likely to get soaking wet along with their treats here in Seattle this Halloween!! Rain, rain, rain and more rain, but at least it isn't cold -- a little chilly, but not cold! Hope your week is going well!! Enjoy this colorful season, Wil!

Lorac said...

Halloween is a great evening for the kids to dress up and walk around the neighbourhood with their friends or family and get treats. It has always been a lot of fun in our family and now the grankids have a fun time. My little granddaughter is so excited!

Shooting Parrots said...

I mentioned on Roger's blog that trick-or-treating is generally regarded as an American import in the UK, but ironically the carved pumpkin idea was imported from Scotland and Ireland to the USA.

The jack-o’-lanterns were originally carved from turnips by the Celts to remember the souls held in purgatory and were replaced by pumpkins that were in more plentiful supply in the New World.

RuneE said...

I see that you were in for busy night :-)
As you know, Halloween celebration is not a Norwegian tradition, although commercial interests are doing their best to make it so. Luckily it rained heavily last night ...

ChrisJ said...

Halloween is not my favorite celebration. In fact growing up in England we didn't celebrate it at all. Perhaps that has changed since we left.

sharplittlepencil.com said...

Wil, we have Halloween in America in part to introduce children to the spooky side of life, to let them be scared a little but knowing the folks have them under their protective wing. It's quite a thrill being young and being out after dark...

I do prefer the Mexican tradition of el dia de los muertos, during which families have little parties at the graveyards for their beloved who have passed on. I think that's a nice way to honor the dead and show kids that graveyards are not scary.

Thanks, Amy
http://sharplittlepencil.com/2012/11/01/november-dilemma/

Carola said...

It is relativly new here in Germany. My kids like to dress and walk around in the neighbourhoud. Nothing for adults here.

Indrani Ghose said...

These are fantastic!
Happy Halloween!

Kay said...

Sigh... We had only 9 children come to our house in Hawaii for Halloween. My daughter had about 100 in Illinois though.