Tuesday, 9 October 2012

ABC Wednesday, M for Music on the Didgeridoo by David Hudson



 Some Australian posts among the entries about Israel and my own country will be used to make one of my students familiar with the English speaking world, which is so rich in cultural and musical details. Here you see the Australian didgeridoo player David Hudson, who teaches us to play this fascinating instrument, which originates from this  continent.


David Hudson: "Well here you see a finished product. You see me cut the didgeridoo, scrape all the bark back. Digeridoo is one of the world's oldest wind instruments. What is so unique of a digeridoo is : you don't have a reed, you don't have fingerholes. It's up to you to do the sound. But use the twine of your tongue,your lip and the sound in your voice box. I can show you how to play the didgeridoo, but it's up to you to put the time and effort in practising every day. One hour, two hours..."

 David tells us not to blow on the wooden instrument like you blow on a trumpet. With a shake of his head, he adds:" it sounds pretty terrible". David shows how you can imitate the dingo by doing five short calls and a long one. He also demonstrates how to imitate the kookaburra, the kangaroo and the little joey. He also says that you need to practise circular breathing. That is continuous blowing while you are breathing. I can assure you that this is very difficult. 

With thanks to Denise Nesbitt, and to Roger. For more interesting ABC posts click on the logo in the sidebar . This week we are looking for words beginning with M.

18 comments:

Shooting Parrots said...

I can see why this would take practice. I shall try it with the tube from the vacuum cleaner!

ladyfi said...

So difficult but such a cool sound!

MERYL JAFFE, PhD - parent, psychologist, teacher, author... said...

Oh what a wonderful glimpse into a culture and world so different from my little corner! Thank you.

Dina said...

It's a great lesson. I never thought about the contribution of termite channels inside the wood.

photowannabe said...

I think I would hyperventilate if I had to do circular breathing.
Terrific post Wil.

Roger Owen Green said...

video is INSTRUMENTAL in your posts quality!
ROG, ABC Wednesday team

Paula Scott said...

I don't know if I can be a convincing dingo, but this kind of music always makes me feel good.

Carver said...

Great post. I think that is such an interesting musical instrument. Carver, ABC-Wed. Team

Leslie: said...

I love the sound it makes, but would be hopeless trying to make any music with it.

Leslie
abcw team

lotusleaf said...

Wow! That was an interesting post and a fascinating video! Thanks for introducing the digeridoo to us.

Mama Pajama said...

I always wondered how that was done - thanks! I'm gonna go check out some more of your blog : )

Lisa said...

Fascinating!! What a wonderful glimpse into a vastly different culture. And the name is fabulous!

Chubskulit Rose said...

My kids have these bamboo music instrument given by a friend from Korea.

Manok... find out what it is
Rose, ABC Wednesday

Hildred and Charles said...

Abswolutely wonderful, Wil, - what a charming man.

Emille said...

This instrument sounds beautiful! I made some attempts, but I'm pretty sure this will take too much time, haha.

Ann said...

I wanted to buy a digeridoo but I have to spend a lot of money to pay for the fumigation.

Cloudia said...

So your grandchildren have re-connected you with the part of the world you spent your own childhood. You are a citizen of the world. How strange to think that you were able to listen to my voice on a local Honolulu radio program from so very far away, that we have met in some authentic way, that we are friends. What a gift


Aloha from Waikiki,
Have a Good Weekend
Comfort Spiral

> < } } ( ° >

sharplittlepencil.com said...

Wil, thanks for stopping by my blog. You don't have to answer my comment, just come back sometime!

My former husband, Riley's father, plays the didgeridoo in his World Music band in the town of Binghamton, New York, in the States. The amount of breath it takes to play one is truly impressive. Thanks for bringing attention to a haunting instrument with indigenous roots. Peace, Amy
http://sharplittlepencil.com/2012/10/13/wedding-night-waxes-poets-united/