Tuesday, 15 May 2012

ABC Wednesday, R of Rescue, Resistance to Repression


With thanks to Denise Nesbitt, who created ABC.We started round 10 of the fascinating meme of ABC. For more interesting ABC posts click on the logo in the sidebar . This week we are looking for words beginning with R.

One of the most remarkable stories I heard in Jerusalem, was the rescue of a great part of the Jewish population in Denmark during World War II.

 On October 1st 1943 Nazi leader Adolf Hitler ordered Danish Jews to be arrested and deported. The Danish resistance movement with the assistance of many ordinary Danish citizens  evacuated about 8,000 Danish Jews in fishing boats  and other small craft to nearby neutral Sweden during ten nights. You can read this on the memorial stone.
The Danish King was very brave. When the Jewish Danes were forced to wear the yellow star of David, he also wore a yellow star and many others did so. This confused the Nazis.

 Wikipedia says:
"The rescue allowed the vast majority of Denmark's Jewish population to avoid capture by the Nazis and is considered to be one of the largest actions of collective resistance to repression in the countries occupied by Nazi Germany. As a result of the rescue and Danish intercession on behalf of the 5% of Danish Jews who were deported to Theresienstadt transit camp in Bohemia, over 99% of Denmark's Jewish population survived the Holocaust."
The top photo shows a statue representing a Danish ship. 

Click on photos if you want to see and read what it says on the memorial  stone.

20 comments:

anthonynorth said...

We're often told in the west nowadays that we have a history of bigotry and racism. The many stories such as this show that our history was often very different.

Sylvia K said...

This is such an incredible piece of history and one I've read about many times and I never fail to be deeply moved! Thank you for sharing this today, Wil! A wonderful reminder that there have always been good and brave people who were free of bigotry and racism. I like to believe there are still many good people like these in our world today! Have a beautiful week!

Sylvia

Carver said...

Great history to feature. I remember hearing that about the King and thinking that's how people should act. Carver, ABC-Wed. Team

Jane and Chris said...

Another thought provoking post. Thank you.
Jane x

Meryl Jaffe, PhD said...

Jews talk about the need for 'Tikun olam" - mending of the world... The Danes exemplified this in World War II. Great post. Have a great week.

photowannabe said...

Incredible history. I thank God for the selfless courage of so many to save people they didn't even know.
It shows humankind can have a caring heart.

George said...

Thanks for this marvelous post about the bravery of Danes on behalf of others who needed help. It is a wonderful story and I'm glad that it is remembered in Jerusalem.

Leslie: said...

I'm always fascinated by the salvation of the Jews during WW2! Great choice for our R week, Wil. Have a radiant week!

Leslie
abcw team

Dina said...

Well captured and well told, Wil.
I always get a tear or two, no matter how many times I read those plaques.
I remember our coffee and cake in Denmark Square.

Stafford Ray said...

So good to see the insanity that was Hitler's nazism is remembered also for the resistance it elicited in so many people who risked so much to do the 'right thing'.

Sallie (FullTime-Life) said...

Valor and kindness in the face of unspeakable horror. Thank you for the reminder of this chapter in History -- your post makes it real!

Roger Owen Green said...

viva RESISTANCE to oppression.
ROG, ABC Wednesday team

Hazel said...

This is the first time I heard a Holocaust story that tells of a very good number of people who survived - 99% is quite a nice bit of this part of history.

Black Jack's Carol said...

I took a post-graduate course in Holocaust literature, and also taught music to a Hasidic Jewish family whose father was born just after peace was declared. He had to remain in the concentration camp for his first six years as the family had no resources to move.

I'm ashamed to say I didn't know the story of the brave Danish king, but I am most grateful to know of it now.

chubskulit said...

This is one wonderful piece of history Wil, thanks for sharing it with us.

R is for RED, come and see.
Rose, ABC Wednesday Team

Arkansas Patti said...

Very interesting part of history I was not aware of. What a wonderful story of compassion and bravery of the Danes but also kudos to Sweden. Of all the horrors of WWII it is so nice to hear of a positive story.
Thank you for bringing it to light.

RuneE said...

The Danes did a great job in this situation - well worth plenty of memorials.

PS Thank you for the nice comment! I do not blog as much as before, so therefore no more themes ...

Robert Geiss said...

What impressive picture that is. Very moving entry indeed.

Please have a good start into the weekend.
(The Sunday Psalm has reached the 63rd)

Dina said...

Hi Wil. I can see from these comments that you did a very good deed (a mitsvah) in making this story more known.

Ann said...

Wars are no good, good to have History taught so people don't repeat.