Monday, 5 March 2012

Our World Today Tuesday, ABC Wednesday, H for Hope Vale in Queensland


During the Second World War, Cooktown became an important base for the war effort. The civilian population of Cooktown was encouraged to evacuate in face of the Japanese advances and by 1942 the vast majority had left. The Aboriginal people of the Lutheran missions at Hope Valley and Bloomfield were forcibly removed - most being taken south to Woorabinda in May, 1942, while some of the elderly people were sent to Palm Island. The senior missionary, Pastor Schwartz (known as Muni to the local people), was arrested and placed in internment as he were suspected as being an enemy sympathiser,but he was not an enemy sympathiser, he was German, highly respected and loved by the Aboriginal people, who have been greatly thankful for his efforts to give them a proper home and work and education. The Aboriginal people were not allowed to return to their homelands until 1949, well after the end of the war.They got a new region to build their compound, which was more in the west of Hope Valley. This new abode of the Aboriginal inhabitants is called Hope Vale. Many Aboriginal people died when moved from their traditional lands, and many Aboriginal and white families never returned from their exile.
Yet many of the elderly people are without feelings of revenge. One of the elders once said to me:"I don't feel that I am a VICTIM, I feel that I am a VICTOR".


Welcome to Our World Tuesday! This meme continues in memory of the work of Klaus Peter, whose "that's My World" brought people together from around the world every Monday to share the wonders therein--big and small.Please click on our new logo for "Our World Tuesday" in the sidebar.

Australia is part of my world too for my youngest daughter lives here, and she has written down the lifestory of one of the uncles of her first husband in a book called: "Cockatoo", My Life in Cape York. See http://www.creativespirits.info/resources/books/cockatoo-my-life-in-cape-york


With thanks to Denise Nesbitt, who created ABC.For more interesting ABC posts click on the logo in the sidebar or Here. This week we are looking for words beginning with H.


Below Hope Vale with its spacious streets and houses, all built after 1949. To see more details you can click on the photos.





31 comments:

Roger Owen Green said...

Yes, a piece of HISTORY I did not know, tho familiar with interment of Japanese-Americans in the US.

ROG, ABC Wednesday team

Marja said...

A sad story as these people lived such piecefull lives and it must have been hard for them being taken away from their land

Dianne said...

Interesting bit of information Wil ... I have to say I didn't know about it before ....we live in a very large country and I'm sure there are still more stories to be told .

Arkansas Patti said...

That was a part of the war history I was unaware of. Not all the casualities of war wore uniforms.
Thanks for such interesting if sad information.

Dina said...

The war uprooted so many.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Over the years the aboriginal people have been treated so badly Wil, but at last there seems to be a movement in the right direction.

Sylvia K said...

A sad, but wonderful post for the day, Wil! So much history! Like Roger, I do know about the very sad internment of so many Japanese here in the US who were interned in spite of the fact many of them had lived here all their lives! It was a sad, hard time for all! Have a great week!

Sylvia

Gary said...

Wonderful post!! Boom & Gary of the Vermilon River, Canada.

Brenda said...

I liked how the elders did not feel a need for revenge and did not feel like they were victims....but Victors. I would love to read the book you referenced.

Snap said...

Really interesting post. I love learning something new!

Kay L. Davies said...

So many people in so many countries were moved like this. As Roger said, in the US, but also in Canada. There was a lot of fear.
K

Randi said...

Interesting info...about history I was unaware of.
Thanks for sharing.

anthonynorth said...

Aboriginals had such a raw deal for far too many years.

Leslie: said...

I'd love to visit Australia some day as I enjoy reading about its history.

Leslie
abcw team

helenmac said...

May we all become Elders and see ourselves as Victors not Victims. The horrors of WWII seem to be endless.
HelenMac
ABCWednesdayTeam

Lisa said...

WWII was such a dark part of our world's history. Most people only think of the war in Europe or with Japan. They don't realize it impacted every country. Thank you for reminding us about these other events.

Hildred and Charles said...

A very sad part of war, - the upheaval of people who happen to be in the wrong place at the wrong time.

photowannabe said...

Oh my, this is a part of history I was not aware of.
Its such a sad story of a peaceful people.
War certainly does ugly things.
Thank you for sharing this today Wil.

zongrik said...

very interesting place and story

henderson hill

Meryl Jaffe, PhD said...

I love learning new things through ABCWednesday! Have a great week.

Karen said...

An interesting bit of history.

Paula Scott said...

I find Australia to be so fascinating and picturesque! And, full on history and stories as the one you've shared with here. WWII affected the world in so many profound ways for so long.

chubskulit said...

That's so sad.

House on the Prairie
Rose, ABC Wednesday Team

Ann said...

was watching the Waga Waga floods, so sad when one place is thirsty for water, and here there is so much water.

Jenn Jilks said...

I keep hoping we will learn to respect treaties and aboriginal peoples around the world. Likely not.

Greetings from Perth, ON Cottage Country!

diane b said...

Interesting story, one we never heard about just after the war in school.

Marie said...

A truly sad chapter in their history! I appreciate you relating this to us so very much!

bluegrassnotes said...

What a moving and yet inspiring story. Thanks for sharing.

Suzy said...

Very interesting piece of history. Thanks for sharing and for visiting my blogs.

Amy Barlow Liberatore/Sharp Little Pencil said...

Indigenous people all over the world have been displaced and/or wiped out by Eurocentric policies, especially true here in the U.S.A. The ultimate moment of this meme was the fact that an elder forgave. Ironic, isn't it, that we young folks still cannot forgive what happened? I pray for peace for all every day. Thank you for visiting my blog and hope you are at peace, Amy

Kay said...

I really admire people who are able to live without bitterness and look forward to peace.