Monday, 26 December 2011

Our World Tuesday, ABC Wednesday, X in Windmill Language.




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As I live in the vicinity of the Kinderdijk windmills, I am always ready to tell something about them. The wings of the mills were used to signal to the other
millers. The position of the wings is important. The X position means that the miller is taking a long break. Some of the mills are having a break on these photos.





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WINDMILL LANGUAGE
For centuries windmills played an important role in the local community: farmers not only visited them with their grain but also with the latest gossip. Because windmills were visible from afar, changes to their appearance were soon noticed. Important events in the community, such as births, deaths, marriages and other festivities were signaled by the position of the sails and the manner in which they were hung. Furthermore, by using certain signals the miller could for example call for the millhand to come, communicate that the mill was temporarily not working or that the miller urgently required work. Even today the mills mark festivities and sorrowful occasions, using the 'windmill language'.


Welcome to Our World Tuesday! This meme continues in memory of the work of Klaus Peter, whose "that's My World" brought people together from around the world every Monday to share the wonders therein--big and small.Please click on our new logo for "Our World Tuesday" in the sidebar.

With thanks to Denise Nesbitt, who created ABC.For more interesting ABC posts click on the logo in the sidebar or Here. This week we are looking for words beginning with X.

42 comments:

Sylvia K said...

I do love the windmills, Wil, and your captures are wonderful! And thanks for the interesting history and information about the roll that they've played in your history! Fascinating! Hope you had a lovely Christmas and wishing you a very Happy New Year!

Sylvia

Arkansas Patti said...

That is quite clever and very interesting.
Hope you had a wonderful holidays and hope your windmills were in C posiion and are now in B position.

Roger Owen Green said...

Hey, Wil, you said you weren't going to do windmills, because people had tired of them. I'm here to say that is NOT the case!

ROG, ABC wednesday team

ladyfi said...

What delightful windmill shots!

Kay said...

What a fun post! We were at Kinderdijk and loved the windmills. No one mentioned how the position of the sails signaled something. It makes all kind of wonderful sense. This is so very interesting!

Tina´s PicStory said...

great idea for X :)

eileeninmd said...

I also love the windmills but, I did not know they were used for signals. Thanks for sharing the meaning of the signals. The photos are great.

Mama Zen said...

I didn't know that! How cool!

Sivinden said...

Interesting information and pictures - there I learned something new:)

Valerie said...

Wonderful windmill images Will (no alliteration intended!) - thank you for sharing the information too about windmill language; fascinating. May you enjoy a healthy 2012.

Robert Geiss said...

Outstanding entry !


daily athens photo

Kay L. Davies said...

I had no idea windmills were used for communication, Wil, but it makes so much sense! Thank you for adding to my store of knowledge.
I hope you continue to be able to bicycle to Kinderdijk in the coming year and for many years thereafter. You are an inspiration to me.
Luv, K

Indrani said...

Very interesting. I like windmills.

Arija said...

Great shot and interesting sign language as well. Like early telegraph towers, they can easily relay messages being in sight of each other.

Hope you had a wonderful Christmas Wil.

Rajesh said...

Never knew that there is so much significance is there in the position of wings in windmill. Thanks for sharing.

Pat said...

This was very interesting, Wil! I had no idea that there was meaning to the different position of the windmill blades. Thank you for sharing this bit of historical information! Hope you had a wonderful Christmas with your friends and family.

Dianne said...

Wonderful captures Will and such an interesting story about th positioning of the wings ( is that what they are called ? )

Gattina said...

We have seen some on our way to Amsterdam, didn't know the language ! We have been celebrating Christmas in Amsterdam/Ijburg, that's a nice place !

Regina said...

Beautiful windmills and history!
Christmas greetings! Hope you had a wonderful Christmas!
Cheers and best wishes for the New Year

Regards.

Regina

Carver said...

What a great idea for the letter X. I love windmills. I hope you had a happy Christmas and New Year ahead.

photowannabe said...

Fascinating information. I never knew that before. It certainly makes sense to have windmill language.
Wishing you a very healthy andd Happy New Year Wil.

anthonynorth said...

I've never heard of that before. interesting post.

Kathy said...

There is certainly a lot to know about windmills!

Leslie: said...

The only windmills I've ever seen were at Cape Cod in Massachussetts, USA. I was fascinated by them! Of course I'm sure the ones in Holland far surpass them, though. Hope you had a lovely Xmas!

Ann said...

Daughter of friends who I knew as a baby are visiting Holland, and the windmills are amazing to her.

Hildred and Charles said...

Beautiful pictures of Windmills, Wil, and I didn't ever realize that they were communication devices as well, but of course, when I think about it, why not!!!! Out on the prairies my Aunt used to hang something red on the clothesline if there was mail for my Grandmother - windmills are much more sophisticated.

Wanda said...

What is not to love in Windmills. They are so extraordinary, and beautiful. What a collection you have shared.

Happy New Year!

chubskulit said...

Unique choice for X.

X-mas or Christmas, which one do you approve of? May you have a prosperous new year!

Paula Scott said...

Wow-would would have thought that windmills were used to communicate announcements? makes sense, though since it is such a prominent landmark!

Tumblewords: said...

Fascinating windmills. I had no idea they were used for communications. Loved this post.

lotusleaf said...

Extremely interesting! I didn't xpect the windmills to have a language.

DawnTreader said...

I never knew that; but then there are no windmills near where I live. (More old watermills around here.) Love your "x"!

Kim said...

Like so many others, I did not know that there was meaning associated with the position. I will look at windmills differently from now on.

Jo Bryant said...

What a great post - i loved Kinderdijk - it was such an amazing place

http://jobryantnz.wordpress.com/2011/12/29/x-is-for-xanthippe/

kml said...

Such beautiful windmills!

Happy New Year to you!

Anya said...

Fijne oudejaarsavond
en veel blogplezier en een goede gezondheid in het nieuwe jaar :-)

Happy New Year

zongrik said...

great choice for X

ornamented joshua

Dina said...

I never knew there was a windmill language. How exciting to learn!

Jennifer A. Jilks said...

How interesting!
They are amazing things, windmills.
Cheers from Cottage Country, Perth, ON, Canada!

Emille said...

Never knew about the sign language of the millers, but it makes sense! Thanks for sharing, Wil! Hope that this new year will bring you much joy and pleasant surprizes:)

Genie said...

When you share these pictures, I feel like I have died and gone to windmill heaven. I want to fly back across the pond and spent weeks traveling around looking at them. They are magical to me, but I think I have told you that in the past. Loved learning about the “X”. Thanks for a great post. genie

Marie said...

This was a fascinating post. I'm sorry I am playing catch-up with you and seem to have missed several recent posts. Such an interesting bit of history, and architecture as well. It must be wonderful living near these awesome windmills.