Tuesday, 2 March 2010

ABC Wednesday, G for Guernsey,




In May 2006, my sister, her husband and I went to spend a week's holiday on Guernsey.We walked a lot and spoke to many islanders, who told us interesting facts about Guernsey. The island is small but has a long and eventful history.

Although Guernsey is geographically closer to the Normandy coast than to the south coast of England it is a dependency of the British Crown.

So why does Guernsey remain loyal to Britain, rather than France her closest neighbour?

It all began in 933 AD when the Channel Islands became part of the Norman Realm. In 1066, the Duke of Normandy landed his army in Sussex and became William I of England. The Channel Islands, however, remained part of the Duchy of Normandy and continued to be governed as such.

When Continental Normandy was lost in 1204 the Channel Islands remained loyal to the King of England as the King promised to rule the islands as though he was the Duke of Normandy (i.e. observing the Duchy’s laws, customs and liberties). This arrangement has been confirmed in charters of successive sovereigns that have secured for the islands their own judiciaries and freedom from the process of the English Courts. Indeed the Islands are independent in all matters with the exception of international representation and defence for which the United Kingdom is responsible.

The islands were the focal point of strife between England and France for many years due to their allegiance to England. At times, the French raided the islands and gained temporary footholds and, as a consequence, there are castles and fortresses around Guernsey that were originally built as a protection against invaders.


With thanks to Denise Nesbitt, who created ABC.For more interesting ABC posts click on the logo in the sidebar or Here. This week we are looking for words beginning with G.

23 comments:

Elisabeth said...

Do you know why we in English use the expression, 'get a guernsey' when someone wins praise?

It must have to do with the island of Guernsey.

Great pictures and what a fantastic holiday, Reader Wil.

Anya said...

Wat een mooi verhaal van een prachtige vakantie :-)

Fijne day ..

Vicki Lane said...

I love the header! I have walked through just such a wood in England.

I've never visited the Channel Islands though I've wanted to ever since reading Elizabeth Goudge's beautiful GREEN DOLPHIN STREET. And now everyone is talking about THE GUERNSEY LITERARY AND POTATO PEEL PIE SOCIETY.

Thanks for the information and for the beautiful pictures, Wil!

Louis la Vache said...

The family of «Louis'» mother fled Normandie for Guernsey during the Huguenot persecutions. In the early 19th century, many of the family moved from Guernsey to what is now Cambridge, Ohio. So many settlers from Guernsey came there the county is named Guernsey County.

Some of the family remains on Guernsey.

gigihawaii said...

Your post was very interesting and informative, Wil. Lovely slides, too.

I toured Western Europe in 1969-70 and Croatia in 1990. Must return for more sightseeing!

Sylvia K said...

Marvelous post and pictures! I love all the history you included! Makes the pictures all the more interesting! Your header shot is absolutely gorgeous!! Hope you have a great week, Wil!

Sylvia

RuneE said...

I have always wanted to visit The Channel Islands, and this post increases the that wish - a delightful post.

Carol said...

Great post for G day. I enjoyed all the information...the slide show is beautiful!

George said...

Thanks for taking us on a tour of Guernsey with you. I enjoyed both your pictures and the history that you gave. I, too, would like to visit the Channel Islands some day.

photowannabe said...

Thank you for the history lesson. I am so ignorant of some history. That looks like a lovely unit to stay in.

Arkansas Patti said...

Loved the tour. The woodland paths pulled me in and the bluebells were lovely.
Everything looks so clean, even the stones in the alley way.
I wonder if that is the home of the Guernsey cow. I will have to check that out on Google.

√ Abraham said...

An interesting post to read. I also enjoyed the pictures a lot.

jeannette stgermain said...

Thanks for sharing your time at Guernsey, Wil! And for the historic info. -makes me want to go on vacation:)

anthonynorth said...

Excellent info on the Channel Islands. Enjoyed that.

Tumblewords: said...

Thanks for this post! I was thinking of this area recently, for some strange reason.

Etje said...

Het mooie van al je postjes is dat je niet enkel foto's plaatst maar er ook nog eens de geschiedenis bijschrijft.

Wat de storm betrefd , hier enkel wat afgewaaide takken. Maar ja in Frankrijk was het ook veel erger he

Hildred and Charles said...

A great post Wil, - thank you for the history and the wonderful picture of the woods and bluebells. I read about the Literary Society last year, and could see the inhabitants of Guernsey were an independent lot.

Grace and Bradley said...

Now I understand the Channel Island better and its relationship with England and the reason of its semi-indenpendence (offshore banking).

Roger Owen Green said...

It's amazing how much fighting happens over relatively small pieces of land. Very interesting history.

Etje said...

En alles oke gisteren met de verkiezingen, hopelijk vallen er geen verrassingen uit de bus

Miss_Yves said...

Nous connaissons cette île, qui se trouve juste en face de notre côte !
Malheureusement , bien qu'elle soit proche, le prix des des traversées est devenu excessif.
Avez-vous visité la maison de Victor Hugo, Hauteville House? Extraordinaire ...
J'aime la présentation du diaporama, les pages qui se tournent ...
Et merci de nous montrer un avant-goût du pritemps sur votre bannière !

jay said...

Another place I've always wished to visit - the channel islands! Guernsey sounds - and looks - so delightful! One day, perhaps.

Kay said...

This is very interesting, Wil. That really looks like such a lovely place.