Tuesday, 16 September 2008

I for Isabella Falls, Indigenous people.


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Click on photos to enlarge!

You'll find Isabella Falls on the Isabella Creek in Queensland about 1580km north-northwest of Brisbane (show me). Isabella Falls is about 184m above sea level.
We estimate that Isabella Falls is between 7.9m and 11m high. This estimate is based on analysis of the topographic profile around the waterfall and may not be an accurate figure for the total fall of water seen if viewing the falls.
The nearest populated place is the village of Hope Vale which is 12km away with a population of around 750 indigenous people.





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Hope Vale is the Aboriginal community, where my daughter’s in- laws live. Her ex- husband lives there too.
Hopevale, (or Hope Vale), Queensland, Australia is a community of indigenous people on Cape York Peninsula about 46 km west of Cooktown, and about 10 km off the Battlecamp Road that leads to Lakefield National Park and Laura. At the 2006 census, Hopevale had a population of 765.[1]
It was established as the Cape Bedford Mission by the Lutheran Church in 1886, with the settlement at Elim on the beach.
Due to worries that the indigenous people might cooperate with the advancing Japanese in World War II, the total population was evacuated south to various communities by the military. The German Lutheran missionaries were sent to internment camps. Most of the people were sent to Woorabinda, near Rockhampton, in Queensland. In just one month, 28 people lost their lives, with nearly a quarter of the people dying over the next 8 years. I heard the story of their evacuation and was shocked by the cruelty of it. The people were not allowed to take any personal possessions with them. They got no food or drink for one day. They had no warm clothes to protect them against the cold. Woorabinda was too cold for them.
Hope Vale was established as a Lutheran Mission in September, 1949. Indigenous people from the Hope Valley and Cape Bedford Missions were settled there. A work crew was allowed to return in 1949 and the first families came home in 1950.
Hopevale is home to several clan groups who mostly speak Guugu Yimidhirr and other related languages, as well as English.

Thanks to Mrs. Nesbitt, who has hosted this ABC game for the third round to the letter I for ABC Wednesday Anthology and/or ABC Wednesday Round 3 See these for other fascinating I entries. Click on logo of ABC in my sidebar.

33 comments:

RuneE said...

I knew of course that the treatment of the indigenous people in Australia was not as it should have been, but I have not heard of details like that. It shocked me indeed. Europeans have a lot to be responsible for.

PS Come visit Norway some day and I'll show you some real waterfalls... ;-)

Old Lady Lincoln said...

Beautiful scenery. Some of the photos look like spots in Fla.

They're still cleaning up around here from the high winds we had on Sunday from hurricane IKE. We lost our cherry tree, we did some cleaning on Sunday afternoon, Monday and finished today. Had a lot of debris thrown around in the yards, twigs, leaves, branches and etc. Since we're older, it takes longer to do some of the jobs we use to be able to do all in one day. LOL

Rebeckah said...

Wow, this is such a great story! I love looking at great pictures and learning at the same time. I haven't even figured out what "I" picture to do this week yet : ). Thanks for sharing. God bless!

Aileni said...

I understand that recently the Australian Prime Minister apologised to the Protoaustralians... in light of all they have gone through, it hardly seems adequate.

photowannabe said...

Fascinating information.
Man's inhumanity to man always shocks me. Beautiful country though.

Abraham Lincoln said...

Sad indeed that people are treated worse than animals and carted off to nowhere but no here. We did it with Native Americans and made a grand mess out of their lives forever more.

I do love your photography, Wil. Seems like I say that every time I come here but then I see so many new things and all are excellent in quality and composition. I don't know if you pride yourself in point and shoot photography but I must say it is way above that.

leslie said...

Great story and photographs of an obviously beautiful spot.

Berthddu Suit said...

Wonderful pictures, makes me want to come back to Oz!

babooshka said...

That was etremely interesting to read and such beautiful images. Well done.

shutterhappyjenn said...

Great great pictures! Thanks for sharing!

My "I" picture is posted here. Happy Wednesday!

Dar's Foto Faze said...

The pictures are wonderful. The story moving.

Kim from Hiraeth said...

Man's inhumanity to man.

It's dreadful what man has done to indigenous people--America has much to be ashamed of in their treatment of Native Americans.

kjpweb said...

Excellent post! And tough to swallow, too!
Klaus

Smart Mouth Broad said...

Always, great photography! Thanks for the Australian history lesson. Once a teacher....... :-)

MEDITERRANEAN KIWI said...

beautiful landscape - the earth looks so red

Bear Naked said...

Thank you for this INFORMATIVE post.
I wrote about some of our Canadian Indigenous people on my blog for ABC Wednesday letter I.

Bear((( )))

antigoni said...

Beautiful pictures of mother nature.

Columbo said...

Thank you for the lovely shots and the commentary on the treatment of the indigenous people. I don't understand it, but we did the same with the American Indians, and other ethnic groups. I love your photography and will be coming back for visits.

naturglede said...

So many great photoes. I enjoyed it:)

me ann my camera said...

The falls are very beautiful! wonderful images for the letter I.
ann at Gallimaufry Gleanings

'JoAnn's-D-Eyes'NL said...

wow! Reader Now I understand why this area is having your interest, ISABELLA falls is great to see, so you Daughter in law is living in Hope Vale , thats interesting... Thanks for the information...

Leuk je reaktie over de treinen en bedankt:)

Visit: JoAnn's D Eyes
www.joannwalraven.blogspot.com

Suburbia said...

I had no idea. Very interesting.
I lkie the waterfall photos :)

Tommy V said...

great post for the "I". The pictures are beautiful.

The Weaver of Grass said...

Because of your own wartime experiences you must identify closely with the people of woorabunda - there was such inhumanity everywhere, wasn't there?

Michelle's Rambling Woods said...

I didn't know this history..when will we learn from the past, especially our government here in the states...

nonizamboni said...

Thank you for an interesting and sobering post and lovely photos. I appreciated your thoughtful explanation of the history of these unfortunate people.

Dragonstar said...

Those falls look so beautiful! This post is fascinating - full of information I didn't know. Thank uyou.

Marie said...

Beautiful photos :)

Janice Thomson said...

How awful the things man does to his own kind - I didn't know this either.
As always your photos are beautiful Wil.

peppylady said...

It sure is pretty I don't know what it is but I like waterfalls.

Is your Aboriginal community some what like what here in United States is called Reservation. It a community that us white Americans made to but on our Native Americans on (Indians)
Lot of tribes start doing casinos it help but also hurt.

Thanks for stopping in again I like your visit and the coffee is always on.

raccoonlover1963 said...

Hi Wil. Love the shots of the waterfall. Waterfalls are beautiful, regardless of how small or how mighty! I finally got my internet back up Wednesday evening. Fixed by a fifteen year old kid, my son's best friend. Hope to see you visit soon.
Lisa

Greyscale Territory said...

Fascinating range of info and loved those pics of the falls!

Dina said...

I did not know about this wartime history. Oi...